Margaret Cashion  |  310-795-2200  |  margaret@HillsofLA.com  |  © 2018  |   CalDRE#01376586

Why Buy Land in The Desert?

One option would be to buy the land, and plant trees as a way to combat the climate crisis.

Read more about the benefits of planting trees here: https://ind.pn/2HtcOfA

 

And an excerpt from the article... "Scientists have established there is room for an additional 1.2 trillion trees to grow in parks, woods and abandoned land across the planet. If such a goal were accomplished, ecologist Dr Thomas Crowther said it would outstrip every other method for tackling climate change."

Here is a list of trees native to the Palmdale/Alpine Butte area, planting native trees is important so it does not cause an upset to the ecosystem...

The Fremont Cottonwood is a large tree growing from 12-35 meters in height. It's an important plant for birds and butterflies.
Fremont Cottonwoods are tough and easy to grow. When properly situated they can reach up to 100 feet in height and 35 feet in width.  Pretty much foolproof as long as it gets enough water.

California Juniper is a species in the Cupressaceae (Cypress) family native to southwestern North America; as the name implies, it is mainly found in California In the garden this plant is tolerant of many soils and requires minimal water once established. It becomes wider than tall so give it plenty of room.

Foothill Pine is a native tree that grows in southern California. It grows in an upright form to a height of 80 feet, and tends to grow in places with poor soils, at elevations from 0-4500 feet. With irrigation even once per month, this tree will grow quickly to 40-60 feet. It's fairly lacey form allows plenty of light to come through, so you can plant understory plants below without much problem.

Mesquite native to the southwestern United States. It is highly adapted to arid environments with a very deep taproot (up to 100 ft.) to reach underground water. The fruit is a nutritious "bean pod" that is valued by many animals and was eaten by native people of the desert. It has spines and caution should be used when deciding where to plant it. It is an essential plant for the desert wildlife garden.

Honey Mesquite, is native to the southwestern United States and an important habitat plant for many species of wildlife. In some settings it will remain a low growing shrub forming dense thickets that are used as refuge by rabbits, quail, and other animals. In other settings it grows as a tree that reaches 20-30 feet, rarely as tall as 50 feet. It is highly adapted to arid environments with a very deep taproot (up to 100 ft.) to reach underground water. It is an essential plant for the desert wildlife garden.